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'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
>> jamie: at this hour we are getting word from japan there could be a third nuclear plant in trouble there. sources are saying that the american committee in japan is reporting update that the plan may have similar plants to explosion from yesterday, partial meltdown. keep it on fox. we'll send it to washington now have a good day. >> shannon: i'm shannon bream live in washington. we begin america's news headquarters with the fox news alert. japan is reeling from what he is calling the worst crisis since world war ii. the threat of nuclear disaster is growing as they try to avert multiple meltdown in nuclear reactors. thousands are dead from the earthquake and the tsunami it caused and more than a million people are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nucle
>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
it for us today. i'm dylan ratigan. "hardball with chris matthews" starts right now. >>> escape from japan. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm christ matthews in washington. happy st. patrick's day. leading off tonight, high anxiety. here's how desperate it's gotten at that nuclear plant over in japan. authorities have been reduced to dumping water from helicopters and spraying water from fire trucks in a last-ditch effort to cool those spent fuel rods. in a moment, we'll hear from a nuclear power regulatory commissioner and get a report from the ground in japan. >>> also, credibility gap. the widening chasm between what the japanese government is saying and what we can believe. it happened at three mile island. it really happened at chernobyl and now it's happening at japan, officials playing down the dangers. we'll try to bridge the credibility gap tonight. >>> plus, the nuclear disaster has once again turned u.s. public opinion, obviously, against nuclear power. could have predicted that. but that hasn't stopped die-hard supporters from calling this a once-in-a-lifetime fluke
will this nuclear crisis in japan get? all four reactors at the fukushima plant are damaged terrifying the local population. people are evacuating the area and even moving away from cities as far away as tokyo. out of 800 workers on the site of the nuclear plants, 50 are still there. only 50 and they are in a very dangerous situation. we'll get a report on the ground on how serious the situation is and what it could mean for americans here at home. >>> plus, how much radiation can anyone be exposed to before risking significant health problems? we'll talk to the experts about how much is too much. >>> i'm going to talk to the weather channel of all people about which direction the winds are now blowing and who is in harm's way. also no surprise here, calling for yet another war. this time it's libya. neocons are asking for a no-fly zone to force gadhafi from power. >>> if a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, how will little knowledge affect michelle bachmann's chances. even well known politician have scant knowledge of their own country's history. we start with the crisis in japan. david alb
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
>>> wild weather this weekend in the bay area! more is on the way. and a crisis in japan gets even more critical as radiation seeps into food and the water supplies. and crews respond to a huge early morning fire in the east bay. >>> good morning. welcome to mornings on 2. it's saturday, march 19th. a wild weekend of weather is ahead of us after really what has already been a pretty wild 24 hours. we have a crew at one of our hardest hit areas, but let's check in first with rosemary to see what is happening right now. >> good morning to you! a lull in what we're looking at for the weekend. we had wild weather yesterday, the thunderstorms we know we had a small tornado in one of our local areas. but we do continue with this weather. getting a little break but a high wind watch expected to move into places overnight. yesterday we saw the gusts reaching 40 miles per hour. they could reach 60 in the overnight hours and tomorrow. we're also tracking radar, little light rain falling in some areas and we'll show you the very latest on that and when we expect the heaviest rain with this ne
that libya is sending gas prices to japan, americans are pessimistic about our economy. a new cnbc poll has 37%, more than a third now, say the economy will get worse in the next year. that is bad news. that's a 16-point rise in the bad news estimate since december. and the poll's all-time high we're really pessimistic about it now. >>> obviously the united states is pleased with yesterday's vote. it sent a strong message that needs to be heated. the efforts by the international community to come together to make clear to colonel gadhafi that he cannot continue violence against his own people. they cannot continue the attack that started out by peacefully demonstrating for changes that are within the right of any human being. >> well there you have it. secretary clinton. welcome back to hardball. secretary clinton today. what's next? the representative to the united nations, national securities reporter mark thompson. let me ask you -- i read two things at the same time. one through the united states through the president reading a particular u.n. resolution. we're going with a no-fly zone
today as one of those troubled reactors in japan. why this could be the worst thing we've hed so far. we'll be right back. i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. no announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, g or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, as or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. ip side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. th it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i
in japan, talking directly about the nuclear crisis for the first time. the president offering help and reassuring folks in the u.s. that they are safe. >> we are bringing all available resources to bear to closely monitor the situation and to protect american citizens who may be in harm's way. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. >> his comments coming amid raids of rising doubts about japan's ability to control this reactor and a potential full-on meltdown. the attempt to cool down the reactors by spreading them with water dropped out of helicopters apparently having little to no impact. restoring power to the plant not happening until tomorrow at the earliest, which would resurrect the water cooling systems. radiation levels at 300 feet above the plant measured today at nearly 9 r.e.m. by comparison, a chest c.t. scan has just about 0.7 r.e.m. you have to get up to 50 to 75 r.e.m. to get immediate symptoms like hair loss as a result of exposure. so, a lot of exposu
in japan. u.s. officials now say the nuclear crisis in japan is worse than three mile island. it's a category five. an we'll get to the latest in the effort to avoid a melt down. you're watching "hardball." >>> welcome back to "hardball." jan has raised its rating of that nuclear disaster to a level five on a seven-point scale and a former member of the nuclear regulatory commission from this country said the crisis surpassed three mile island. there it is on that grid. time is running out as workers feverishly race to prevent a full-blown meltdown and a nuclear chain reaction. more on the desperate situation. let's turn to mike it will freedlander, a former senior nuclear power plant operator and david albright, president of the institute for science and international security. well, mike, let's go to this whole question. what does it mean to go to five? >> well, probably the more relevant point is what does it mean to be similar to three mile island. the bottom line is we have a situation where the nuclear complex has been compromised as a result of a station blackout. the reac
america. >>> in japan, new problems at the country's crippled nuclear complex are overshadowing some success at cooling the plant's overheated reactors over the weekend. there had been some optimism. this morning, workers at the facility were evacuated after gray smoke rose from the spent storage pool at the plant's number three reactor. it development comes after officials said they had successfully restored water pumps to two other reactors, putting them under control in a state known as a cold shutdown. the crisis, far from over with the discovery of radiation-tainted vegetables and tap water adding to public fears about contaminated food and drink. all that as officials now predict the death toll there in japan will exceed 18,000 from the earthquake and tsunami that followed. the situation in japan has raised questions in the u.s. energy secretary steven chu weighed in on a controversial nuclear reactor in new york city. >> we'll have to look at weather the reactor should remain. again, i don't want to jump to some judgment about what we should do going forward. the nrc will be l
cuisinart. >> caught on air, disaster in japan, 11:00 p.m. eastern eastern on msnbc. you can have the last word online at our blog, and follow my tweets at lawrence. "the rachel maddow show" is up next. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what
. the nuclear crisis in japan taking a new and potentially dangerous turn today. japan's nuclear safety agency warning the situation at the quake-damaged reactor, that it may not be under control. japanese engineers considering a last-ditch effort to prevent a full-scale meltdown. the government is calling it a race against time to prevent a cat traffic radiation leak that could affect millions of people. priority one, cooling the overheating fuel rods, trying to prevent a massive radiation leak. that may run into problems as well. trace gallagher has more. trace? >> reporter: experts have been saying for days that japan has been downplaying the severity of the crisis. they've upped the crisis from a four to a five. the country is saying they're overwhelmed and calling for the united states to help them stop this crisis. they've gotten some power to reactor 2. the hope is, they can use that power to turn on the cooling pump to get cool water on the reactors and spent fuel rods, but there's a problem. the l.a. times is reporting that nuclear regulatory commission believes the pool holding the s
bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was actually on the outskirts of this city, but was not planning to come in. this after reports that the cease-fire was followed by heavier fire from khadafy's army against civilians and soldiers rebel fighters. we
the street in the arab world tonight. >>> plus the other huge story out of japan. the latest news from japan is not encouraging. smoke out of the two reactors forced workers out of the area today and now traces of radiation found in water, in sea water, and in food. and finally, you know things are getting bad for sarah palin when she criticized president obama in india over his handling of libya and gets bashed by conservatives for being out of her depth. conservatives mind you and being illiterate on foreign affairs. >>> we start with the war in libya. richa richard engel, the best in the business, joins us from tobruk. what is happening in this war? i can't ask a wider question, richard. what is going on in the war? are we going after gadhafi? what are we doing in this war exactly do we know? >> reporter: the rebels here think we are giving them unconditional military support. their only strategy seems to be allow the u.s. and other military powers to scorch the earth and destroy gadhafi's military so that they can make a very slow advance toward tripoli. they do see there was a humanitar
,000 people there. meanwhile in japan, another set back in the effort to control the japanese doubled fukushima plant. there are high levels of radioactive elements in the water there. there is more efforts to pump fresh water in the reactor there. dominic? >>reporter: uma, that's right. u.s. forces and japan getting involved. the navy has two naval barges loaded with 550,000 gallons of fresh water to be pumped in the plant. they are making it up to deliver the water. the united states air force is using c130 to deliver 500 tons was freshh bottled water up to sendai, close to the plantt where there are difficulties getting uncontaminated supplies of water and helping out the public there. the air force based out of the air base west of tokyo, home to 306,000 servicemen who are caught up in this as much as the japanese citizens. >> japp -- japan is our ally and our home. when something happen to japan and we are able to help we are glad to. we raised our hands to say yes, we can help you out. >> the utilit company said the water is contained. but the government is not sure if they are
talking about the japan on the effect but now we're adding libya. >> there are so many periods of unrest all over the world but right now, i think wall street is focused on libya. probably it would have ended up higher if we know what was going to happen because a lot of people were afraid to put their money in, not knowing what was going to be happening but it is taking oil off the market. a lot of times when oil is off the market, oil will go up and so will gas prices. what we can expect from wall street is a lot of volatility. we're not going to see up, up or down, down, there are lots of reasons we should take a correction. s&p 500 is well above since december. >> heather: when you see the markets fluctuate according to large events, whether they be domestic or international, what affect does it have if any when you have so many events at once going on? >> the markets are going to be leading indicator, to be a fortune teller in a sense, priced in all of these things. it has been much more reactive of late. but has taken a positive stance toward japan. pretty positive stance to libya.
gadhafi actually survive? >>> plus a top nuclear scientist says the disaster over in japan reminds us over here that the nuclear industry over here in the united states has gained control of the agency, which is supposed to regulate it. the nuclear regulatory commission. in other words, in the nrc, the foxes are guarding the hen house. how do we fix this baby? >>> and the juiciest story of the day for "hardball." it's now likely that michelle bauchmann will launch a exploratory committee. but she says she hasn't decided whether or not to run or not for the president. when was the last time anybody watch canning remember someone forming an exploratory committee running for president and not actually running? by the way, didn't we create her here? let's all thank sarah palin for setting us straight. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is now about to speak. we're breaking here, breaking news. let's listen to her live. >> 1907 and 1972 and protect the civilians of libya. events have moved very quickly. so let's be clear about where we stand and how we got here. when the libyan people sough
to the latest headlines out of japan, a measuring station in california has picked up radiation read innings the southern part of the state. a diplomat with access to the numbers says they are about a billion times beneath levels considered harmful to humans. and meantime, the crisis at the fukushima plant is getting worse. japanese authorities raise the accident rating from a 4 to a 5 after finding evidence of a partial meltdown in three of the reactor. a level 5 is the same classification as three mile island. japan's prime minister is asking the nation to come together to rebuild devastated areas. authorities say the number of confirmed dead is more than 6,900 and more than 10,000 people are missing. joining me now to talk about the latest developments in the nuclear crisis is arjoun makisani. arnie gunderson was an expert into the investigation of the three mile island accident. arnie, i'll start with you, now that we have this classification that puts japan at the same level as three mile island. >> this in my opinion is already worse than three mile island and should be a 6 instead of
: u.s. navy is rushing to deliver fresh water to japan's damaged nuclear plant to replace the corrosive sea water to try to cool the overheated reashh. fear is the sea water could further compromise efforts to stabilize the reactors. all of this coming as another spike in radiation. japanese government spokesperson the efforts of plant's workers seem to be keeping from the situation getting worse but it's too soon to be optimistic. >> heather: tea party helped the republicans win the house but house speaker john boehner is feeling the heat from some in the tea party movement. tea party nation sounder, he is accusing the speaker of a breaking a pledge to slash spending so he is pushing for a primary opponent against boehner. here is managing editor of the hill. thank you for joining us. let's get off the top, judson phillips he as bull's-eye on the speaker of the house. he says he is a compromised too much when it comes to spending. in your opinion should speaker boehner be concerned and what sort of fracture is this creating on capitol hill? >> she going to win his next re
controller who has been suspended. >>> ahead, our first look at workers inside japan's crippled nuclear plant who are trying to prevent that meltdown, two of them now hospitalized. we'll tell you what happened. plus, a massive firebreaks out at miami's international airport. flights have been affected by this. what happened here? incredible video. >>> michele bachmann, step closer to making an announcement on her potential presidential aspirations for 2012. what she said a short time ago.e running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. the morning after the big move starts with back pain... and a choice. take advil now... and maybe up to 4 in a day. or, choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. smart move. ♪ >>> wk back to "news nation." take a look at this raging fire early this morning at miami international airport. the blaze at the fuel depot finally brought under control. dozens of flights in and out of miami
at some point. thank you, william bratton for joiningus. >> can japan import enough bottled water to ease fears of nuclear contamination? >>> open court. chris brown says he's sorry about his latest outburst, but could his morning meltdown land him behind bars? >>> time for the "your business" entrepreneur of the week. beach volley players turned their passion into a year-round activity. they created the sand box in mystic, connecticut, the only indoor volleyball facility in new england. they're attracting players around the reege to this unique concept. watch "your business" sunday mornings 7:30 on msnbc. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] with amazing innovation, driven by relentless competition, wireless puts the world at your command. ♪ wireless puts the world at your command. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [scraping] [piano keys banging] [scraping] [horns honking] iteelie's holdyourarack. let me guess, 16. [laughing] yeeah. that's why there's castrol gtx... w
>>> a suspected breach at the reactor core of one of the crippled nuclear plants. japan's prime minister calls the situation grave and serious. a sea of protesters in yemen with demonstrators demanding their leader leave now. what does all this mean for the u.s. war on terror? >>> asleep in the tower. troubling questions about who is keeping watch at the nation's other airports as officials now confirm an air traffic controller was napping on the job. >>> it's friday. so do you have your office beer ready? apparently booze in the workplace is making a comeback. could it actually make us more productive? >>> we begin with the devastate nug develop in japan, radioactive contamination from the troubled fukushima nuclear power plant more severe than first thought. japan's prime minister spoke just a short time ago, calling the situation there very grave and serious. nuclear safety officials now suspect a dangerous breach in the core of a reactor. the evacuation zone has expanded from a 12-mile radius. people who are up to 19 miles mr. the plant are being told to leave. >>> also this
of damage. they say it could take five years for japan to rebuild. but economists are saying that despite initial detrimental affects to the japanese economy, the rebuilding will likely end up as a good thing in the long term. which honestly, i don't believe. japan is a crushing debt burden and this cannot help that. it's interesting. me versus the economists of the world. let's see who's right. all right, now, what's the acceptable amount of military power in libya and will operation odyssey dawn work? we look at examples of u.s. military intervention in the past to the see what worked and what didn't work to help us determine what we can do right in libya. we'll get answers from colonel jack jacobs and juan cole next. so you have five brothers. tough being the only girl. aw, there's the man of the house. who's this ? this is rufus. hey, rufus. he's actually pretty talented. you wanna see him do a trick ? ok. hey rufus. who do we love ? we love our bank. we love our bank. we love our bank. we love our bank. yes, yes. you really love your bank don't you. ally bank customers love our 24/7
morning, everybody. this is a shocking development out of japan. imagine how concerned you would be as a parent if there was radiation in the drinking water that was twice the recommended level for infants. >> that's what millions of parents in tokyo are dealing with this morning. levels of radioactive iodine were found at a treatment center. now parents are advised not to give it to infants. the latest in a live report from tokyo ahead. >> also ahead, richard engel has made his way to the rebel front lines in libya following a fourth straight night of coalition missile strikes. >> a lot of serious stories to talk about. but on a lighter note, have you seen this viral video. this is a 5-month-old boy who can't decide what to make of the sound of his mom blowing her nose. first he's laughing, then horrified. then bursts out laughing again. i think 8 million people have watched this online. we'll watch the little boy and his parents coming up. >> on a more serious note, the dangerousle levels of radiation in tokyo's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bo
to people in places like japan and kwlab. between to switch gears and talk about the crisis in japan. tokyo's drinking water supply has spiked to radiation levels dangerous for infants. emergency workers were evacuated yet again. robert bazell is in tokyo with the details on this story. bob, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. you can see it is raining here in tokyo now. the fact is it has been raining like this for days. it has driven the radiation escaping from the plant into the ground and into the groundwater. as a result, main distribution station for water here in tokyo, they found radioactive iodide levels. you can imagine that's very concerning for a lot of parents. at the reactor itself as we pointed out, some signs of progress but the black smoke and other things are setbacks. this is a crisis that shows no sign of ending any time soon. at this water plan that serves the greater tokyo area, officials found levels of iodide twice as high it is a standard for infants. officials told parents to only give infants bottled water. yet again today black smoke rising from reactor numb
have been saved. meanwhile as we speak, our troops are supporting our ally japan, leaving iraq to its people, stopping the taliban's momentum in afghanistan, and going after al qaeda all across the globe. as commander-in-chief, i am grateful to our soldiers, sai r sailors, airmen, marines, coast guardsmen and to their families. and i know all americans share in that sentiment. for gene h anchor of global security and as an advocate of human freedom. mindful of the risks and costs of military action, we are naturally reluctant to use force to solve the world's many challenges. but when our interests and values are at stake, we have a responsibility to act. that's what's happened in libya over the course of these last six weeks. libya sits directly between tunisia and egypt. two nations that inspired the world when their people rose up to take control of their own destiny. for more than four decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant, moammar gadhafi. he has denied his people freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorized innocent peo
. >> a lot of countries -- you can't go to japan and become 100% japanese. you look different, you're not going to be japanese. or china. other countries are so monocultural, you can't break in no matter what you do, no matter how many years you've stayed there. we've had issues over the years, but we're working on them. will this work for or against simulation? against it? >> absolutely. america will not win the war against terrorism without the help of muslims. i was a muslim who worked in homeland security -- >> so, you're muslim? >> absolutely. one of two. keith ellison is the first. i helped thwart these efforts. congressman schakowsky was right. i was reminded of a conversation at the constitutional convention. ben franklin was asked definitively, what do we have, a monarchy or a republic? he said a republic, if we can keep it. >> congresswoman, your thoughts. i want you to speak for the feelings of people you represent. i know you have people of islamic faith in your district. you have a very varied district. what's this going to do a week from now when they know they've bee
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